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'Finding Your Roots' scandal is 'teachable moment,' PBS president says

Saturday, August 1, 2015 6:53 pm

The future of "Finding Your Roots" is still up in the air, PBS president Paula Kerger said Saturday, more than a month after an embarrassing scandal.

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  • Personal Social Media Account Security

    Wednesday, April 22, 2015

    For many of us, social media has become a part of our everyday lives and helps us conveniently keep tabs on the people and topics we care most about.

    Recently however, there has been an increase of social media account take overs by cybercriminals. As stated in the media, one contributing factor in some of the social media account takeovers has been the use of weak passwords.


    Tips for creating a stronger password:


    • Passwords should typically:
      • be at least 8 characters in length
      • contain at least 1 number
      • contain at least 1 special character (!@#$$%)
      • contain both upper and lower case characters.
    • Do not use your name, date of birth, maiden name, mother’s maiden name, address, or other easily guessable words for passwords. 
    • Another way to create a strong password is to use a series of words that do not relate to each other. For example, JumpingFastRelaxStop!#.

     


    Social media additional security options:


    Another way to help avoid social media account takeover is to use the additional security options available. Two-factor authentication adds an extra layer of security that drastically decreases your chances of account takeover. Two-factor authentication is essentially the using of two separate components to verify your identity, the combination of something you HAVE with something you KNOW. A good example of two-factor authentication you most likely are already used to is withdrawing cash from an ATM, for example. Having both your debit card AND knowing a pin number is required to complete the withdrawal and protect your identity.

    A popular and convenient two-factor authentication method is using a combination of both an online password and a text message verification sent to your phone. Enabling this type of authentication typically follows this process:

    1. Enter your password into Facebook or another website
    2. Immediately receive a text on your phone with a temporary pass key
    3. Enter the passkey received back on the site/app and you’re logged in

    This may seem like overkill, but enabling this two-factor authentication will drastically decrease the chances of your social accounts being hacked. And actually, the process of setting up and using this authentication is pretty simple and convenient.

     


    How to enable two-factor authentication:


    Many popular social networks like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIN, and others already support two-factor authentication. To learn more about how to do so on the most popular sites on the web, be sure to check out this article:

    http://socialcustomer.com/2014/04/how-to-enable-two-factor-authentication-on-50-top-websites-including-facebook-twitter-and-others.html

  • Proactive Steps to Take in Light of Anthem Data Breach

    Sunday, February 15, 2015

    Chances are you are a person who has Anthem insurance coverage or you know someone who does. As a result, either you or your friend has a reason to be concerned.

    A typical data breach includes a compromise of debit card numbers or partial personal identifying information. This kind of breach, though inconvenient, can typically be ‘fixed’. An initial investigation indicates that the Anthem breach includes a compromise of name, birthday and/or social security number. This kind of information is all one needs to steal someone’s identity.

    According to Anthem this particular breach could affect up to 80 million people. Instead of trying to ignore this has happened or just being upset, it’s now time for you to be educated and try to protect yourself as best as you can. We have some tips that will help you accomplish that.


    1. Review Your Statements


    First, take a moment each month to view your eStatement or monthly statement. You can monitor your accounts throughout the month with Online Banking and the MutualBank App. Monitoring your accounts will give you the quickest opportunity to see if your accounts have been compromised. If you notice any transactions that are unfamiliar or questionable, please get in touch with your MutualBanker. Call us at 800-382-8031.


    2. Be Cautious with Any Anthem Emails You Receive


    Next, if you receive an email stating it is from Anthem, be cautious. Anthem’s website warns customers not to reply with information, click any links or open any attachments within the email. Anthem is not calling their customers and will not ask for information. Never give your credit card information, social security number, or other sensitive information to someone via email or over the phone.


    3. Consider Freezing Your Credit


    If you are a resident in Indiana, the Attorney General’s office website (http://www.in.gov/attorneygeneral/2853.htm) is offering and encouraging you to sign up for a free credit freeze with each of the three credit bureaus. A credit freeze places a hold on your credit where a new line of credit could not be obtained without you unfreezing your credit. This doesn’t affect already open credit lines like an existing credit card, yet helps to protect you against someone opening new lines of credit in your name.


    4. Keep in the Know


    Finally, try to keep in the loop on the Anthem Breach. The best source for current information about this breach can be found at Anthem’s Frequently Asked Questions. (http://www.anthemfacts.com/faq)

    MutualBank is here to help inform you of ways to help protect against identity theft. Thank you for trusting us.

  • A new wi-fi security risk that may affect you

    Saturday, January 24, 2015

    If you’re like most Americans, you probably access the internet most of the time from your home’s wireless network. While this is a nice convenience, having a router (the device that sends out the wi-fi connection signal) opens up some security vulnerabilities that you need to proactively protect against.

    Whether your internet service provider gives you a router to use or if you have your own, from time to time there can be different types of router-based vulnerabilities that emerge, potentially putting your browsing privacy and information at risk.


    A New Router Vulnerability: The Misfortune Cookie


     A new vulnerability has been discovered that affects a least 12 million home or small office routers called the Misfortune Cookie (CVE-2014-9222). This vulnerability can be exploited to give an intruder remote access to a home router and can be used to attack different devices that are connected to that router.

    If the attacker can exploit this Misfortune Cookie Vulnerability on your router, the attacker will now be in the middle between you and the internet. The attacker could see all information flowing in and out of that router. This could enable them to capture usernames/passwords, sensitive banking information, and many other types of highly sensitive information flowing though the router.

     


    What can you do about it?


    1. Check to see if your router model is on the vulnerability list:
    https://www.checkpoint.com/downloads/partners/Misfortune_Cookie_FAQ.pdf

    2. Check with the maker of your router to see if they’ve released an update that fixes the Misfortune Cookie Vulnerability.

    3. Enable a firewall
    A firewall is a software program or piece of hardware that helps screen out hackers, viruses that try to reach your computer over the Internet. Most operating systems that come with a PC or an Apple computer have firewall capabilities. Learn more here (http://www.microsoft.com/security/pc-security/firewalls-whatis.aspx)

    4. Make sure there is an “https://” at the beginning of your browser’s address bar when visiting a site.
    This simply indicates that the site you are browsing has extra security protocols in place to protect your information shared on the site. This is especially important on sites where provide sensitive information (like your financial institution’s website or an online store).

    5. Update all of your software regularly and use an antivirus program
    Software programs also have potential to create security risks if they are not updated on a regular basis. Whenever there is an update for software you have, it’s always a best practice to install the update. The same goes for your antivirus software. Always make sure it’s up to date and running on your machine / device.

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